Southern Charm

Watermelon Queen visits Witless Bay seniors home

By Mark Squibb | Vol. 12 No. 16 (August 5, 2019)

“I’m gonna try to speak in a way that ya’ll can understand me,” joked Miss Meredith McGlamory in her rich southern drawl.

Alerwood resident Bride Martin welcomes Georgia's Watermelon  Queen. Mark Squibb photo

Alerwood resident Bride Martin welcomes Georgia's Watermelon

Queen. Mark Squibb photo

McGlamory is the 2019 Georgia Watermelon Queen, and was on tour in the province to promote, naturally, watermelons.

The annual tour is part of the Georgia Watermelon Association’s promotional effort to increase sales of the summer time treat.

Since being crowned Queen in February, McGlamory has travelled through Georgia, the rest of the United States, Toronto and Newfoundland and Labrador.

She was at Alderwood estates in Witless Bay last Wednesday, July 31.

“And I have to say, this is definitely my favorite place I’ve traveled so far,” she told the crowd of about 30, and was rewarded by cheers and applause.

“It’s beautiful here, and I love the people here, they have been so nice to me, and so welcoming. It reminds me a lot of Georgia, how everyone has welcomed me and been so nice to me. You have a beautiful place here to call home,” McGlamory said.

“We went on a whale sighting (trip) the other day, and I could just sit on that boat for hours,” she told the Irish Loop Post in an interview afterwards. “When I was riding on the boat, I loved looking up and I was like, ‘I’m in some kind of movie right now. I see this in movies, the edges of the cliffs and the water crashing on them.’”

McGlamory said, the rugged terrain reminded her of landscapes seen in movies like The Lord of The Rings.

Elderwood Estate resident Betty Swain teaches Meredith McGlamory the Newfoundlnad Waltz, while Ron and Sheilagh Harvey play a number of traditional Newfoundland jigs and tunes. Mark Squibb photo

Elderwood Estate resident Betty Swain teaches Meredith McGlamory the Newfoundlnad Waltz, while Ron and Sheilagh Harvey play a number of traditional Newfoundland jigs and tunes. Mark Squibb photo

“I could live here, I know I could,” she said. “I don’t know about winter months, if I’d survive, but right now I’d be good.”

McGlamory visited various Coleman’s stores and other local organizations in her tour of the province.

Her connection with the agricultural world isn’t just surface either.

She grew up on a farm and attends Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, where she is double majoring in animal science and communications. She hopes to graduate in 2021 with both degrees, and then apply to a veterinarian program.

“I might even be here,” she said. “I talked to someone the other day at the Newfoundland Drive Coleman’s there, and she was actually from Birmingham, Alabama, and came here for vet school and stayed because she liked it so much. So who knows where I’m going to be one day.”

McGlamory also has a personal connection to farming watermelons.

“I don’t think they (farmers) get the credit they deserve,” she said. “My father’s a farmer, and I grew up in the ag world, and I realized somebody needed to be the voice of agriculture, and what better way to do that then winning a pageant that promotes an agriculture commodity, such as watermelons.”

Teresa Lawrence (left), Elderwood Estates’ own Watermelon Queen, with Georgia Watermelon Queen Meredith McGlamory.  Mark Squibb photo

Teresa Lawrence (left), Elderwood Estates’ own Watermelon Queen, with Georgia Watermelon Queen Meredith McGlamory.

Mark Squibb photo

Growing up, her family grew peanuts, peaches, and enough feed for 300 head of cattle. But not watermelon, not anymore anyway.

“My father got out of the watermelon business, because it’s a very risky business, with the prices,” McGlamory explained. “We’re so grateful ya’ll like watermelon so much, because Georgia is in need of having more shipments out.”

McGlamory likes her watermelon best picked fresh from the field outside her Georgia home, slightly warm, and salted. “I could probably survive off watermelon in the summer,” she allowed.

While touring the province, she has had some interesting encounters. Mostly form the younger crowd. “He (a little boy) just started bowing down, and I said, ‘Oh gosh, please don’t do that,’ and then it makes me turn red, and he goes ‘Well, you are a queen, so I guess I need to bow down to you.’”

McGlamory said a little girl lost interest when she found out she didn’t live in a castle like the Disney princess.

There was no bowing before the Queen at Alderwood.

There was however, lots of dancing, singing and picture taking.

And watermelons, of course.

Posted on August 21, 2019 .